Teachable Moment Mondays

What do Hottentot Venus and the acceptance of Blackness in America's corporate environment have in common? More than you think. Today's teachable moment discusses the vilification and exotification of Saartjie "Sara" Baartman "aka Hottentot Venus" for being different in a 19th century London in comparison to Black America's vilification and exotification in the workplace for being different even now, the 21st century.

I often wonder what white people are thinking when they see a Black person coming down the street. Do they really see me or are they looking through a filter of the past? Is the expectation that I will be the one to walk around because my ancestors were forced to do so for so many centuries? Today's Teachable Moment asks these questions and offers some solutions that could change this experience for all us.

Today I want to talk about the history of education for Black people in this country. Last week, I spoke on a panel for white allies, and one of the questions was to help the group understand what microaggressions look like. The one that gets stuck in my craw every time I hear it is when a white person says either someone Black or I am so "articulate." Today's message explains why…

While shopping for wine in a local wine shop in Monterey, a white woman felt it necessary to point out how she'd never spent $52 on a bottle wine. Rather than respond with an attitude, I chose to respond to the words she spoke rather than my assumption of what she was really saying in a passive aggressive way. This is a perfect example of why we shouldn't add meaning to what someone says!

Last week, I talked about my experience in a local wine shop in Monterey. I shared the experience on Facebook and one of my so-called white friends took offense. She couldn't hear my truth because she got caught up in the effects of white privilege and the microaggressions that accompany that privilege. In fact, she went to the extreme to let me know how little she really thought of me. Take a look! I'd love to hear your thoughts!

Today I want to talk about the history of education for Black people in this country. Last week, I spoke on a panel for white allies, and one of the questions was to help the group understand what microaggressions look like. The one that gets stuck in my craw every time I hear it is when a white person says either someone Black or I am so "articulate." Today's message explains why…

A brief commentary to the people who don't understand why Black people and the BLM movement is upset when a white police officer kills a Black person because Black people kill each other all the time. You don't have to agree with me, but it would be nice if you could put your "Hat of Humanity" on so you can hear what I am saying.